Genetics of ash dieback resistance in a restoration context - experiences from Denmark (2024)

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Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research

Silvicultural strategies for Fraxinus excelsior in response to dieback caused by Hymenoscyphus fraxineus

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Jo Clark

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Genetic predispositions of common ash to the ash dieback caused by ash dieback fungus

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Jiří Rozsypálek

The paper reviews information on ash dieback, a serious disease of common ash and its causing agent ash dieback fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus. This paper covers biology and genetics of the causing agent. Main emphasis is given to the genetic predisposition of the tolerance to the disease. Strong genetic control of the infection-tolerance opens the possibility for selection of hyposensitive trees for the establishment of seed orchards, which will produce offspring with improved tolerance to H. fraxineus.

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Maarten de Groot

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Ash dieback due to Hymenoscyphus fraxineus: what can be learnt from evolutionary ecology?

2016 •

Ottmar Holdenrieder

The future existence of common ash (Fraxinus excelsior), an important tree species throughout temperate Europe, is threatened. An invasive fungal disease (ash dieback) has spread through much of the distribution area of common ash. The causal agent of the disease is Hymenoscyphus fraxineus, a necrotrophic ascomycete, most probably introduced from Asia in the early 1990s. Hymenoscyphus fraxineus infects ash trees and saplings through their leaves, from which it grows into the stem. The fungus was studied intensively in recent years but there is still a need to address the topic from an evolutionary perspective. In this overview, some key evolutionary aspects of ash dieback are discussed, from the Red Queen dynamics of host–pathogen interactions to the probable consequences for virulence evolution of multiple infections. The progression of ash dieback in Europe does not show spatial differences, but studies show variation in susceptibility within host populations, a probable consequen...

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Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry

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Diana Marciulyniene

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Ash dieback due toHymenoscyphus fraxineus: what can be learnt from evolutionary ecology?

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Host Range of Hymenoscyphus fraxineus in Slovak Arboreta

Katarína Pastirčáková

The health of 34 different Fraxinus taxa in association with the pathogenic fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus was assessed in four Slovak arboreta. Averaged across all arboreta, nearly one-quarter (24.9%) of all evaluated trees showed ash dieback symptoms. The damage was most serious on the common ash F. excelsior, a native species. The percentage of dead trees did not exceed 2% for all evaluated trees. Generally, ash trees of all ages were affected, though the intensity of the damage varied among the sites. The identity of H. fraxineus was confirmed by conventional PCR targeting the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of the nuclear ribosomal DNA, as well as the 18S gene/ITS-2 region of the rDNA operon. In Slovakia, the pathogen has expanded its host range from native species not only to their ornamental cultivars, but also to introduced North American (F. cinerea, F. latifolia, F. pennsylvanica, F. quadrangulata) and Asian (F. bungeana, F. chinensis ssp. rhynchophylla, F. man...

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Scientific Reports

Advanced spectroscopy-based phenotyping offers a potential solution to the ash dieback epidemic

2018 •

Luis Rodriguez-Saona

Natural and urban forests worldwide are increasingly threatened by global change resulting from human-mediated factors, including invasions by lethal exotic pathogens. Ash dieback (ADB), incited by the alien invasive fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus, has caused large-scale population decline of European ash (Fraxinus excelsior) across Europe, and is threatening to functionally extirpate this tree species. Genetically controlled host resistance is a key element to ensure European ash survival and to restore this keystone species where it has been decimated. We know that a low proportion of the natural population of European ash expresses heritable, quantitative resistance that is stable across environments. To exploit this resource for breeding and restoration efforts, tools that allow for effective and efficient, rapid identification and deployment of superior genotypes are now sorely needed. Here we show that Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy of phenolic extracts from u...

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Journal of Forest Science

Phenotypic variability of Fraxinus excelsior L. and Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl under the ash dieback disease in the Czech Republic

2018 •

Jiří Rozsypálek

The study was carried out in the experiment with 16 provenances of common ash (Fraxinus excelsior Linnaeus) and 2 provenances of narrow-leaved ash (Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl) at a series of 5 parallel trial plots established in a gradient from lowland riverine to upland ravine sites. The role of the site, ash species and the provenance of common ash proved to have significant effects on the intensity of ash dieback (ADB) associated with the infection by Hymenoscyphus fraxineus (T. Kowalski) Baral, Queloz & Hosoya at the age of 20 years. Narrow-leaved ash was healthier, surviving and growing better than common ash on the trials situated inside as well as beyond its natural range. The ADB intensity was lower in the medium altitude and more easterly located trial plots with a more continental climate. The provenance of forest reproductive material proved to have a significant effect on the ADB damage and survival rate as well as the growth of ash across the trial plots of the experiment.

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Investigation of constitutive phloem phenolics in European ash (Fraxinus excelsior) with different phenotypic susceptibility to ash dieback

2019 •

Hjalmar Holm

European Ash (Fraxinus excelsior) is an important species for biodiversity through-out Europe. The species is critically threatened due to an alien invasive fungus, Hymenoscyphus fraxineus. Some individual F. excelsior trees however show better resistance to H. fraxineus giving hope that the population can be saved. The under-lying mechanisms associated with this resistance however are still not clear. In ear-lier work, chemotypes could be clearly distinguished between susceptible and re-sistant ash trees. The aim of this thesis is to investigate the quantitative and qualitative differences in ash constitutive phenolics that may in part explain the observed resistance in some ash trees. Ash trees of known susceptibility to H. fraxineus from five different European countries were sampled for stem phloem tissue and phenolics were ex-tracted in a butylated hydroxyanisole methanol solution. Chemical analysis using Time-of-Flight Mass spectrometry reveals significant differences in level...

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Genetics of ash dieback resistance in a restoration context - experiences from Denmark (2024)

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