Mary Berry’s Chocolate Roulade Recipe (Great British Bake Off) (2024)

Table of Contents
Ingredients Equipment Instructions Pointers, tricks and troubleshooting tips for the perfect Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe What does roulade mean? How do you pronounce the word roulade? What is a roulade? What's the difference between a roulade and a pavlova? What is the difference between a Swiss roll and a roulade? Is Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe easy to make? Will I need any special equipment to make Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe? How can I tell if my cream has gone off? How can I tell if eggs have gone off? How can I test whether my eggs have gone off? How can I tell if my butter has gone off? How should I store butter? Is Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe suitable for vegetarians? Is Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe suitable for vegans? Is Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe gluten-free? Is Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe keto-friendly? Is Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe healthy? Is Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe safe to eat while pregnant? What goes well with Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe? Why do I have to whisk the egg whites and yolks separately in this recipe? Is this sponge a chiffon cake? Why are egg whites important in a chiffon cake sponge? What is the best way to fold in the egg whites? Can I add extra chocolate to this recipe? How should I store Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe? How long will Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe keep? Can I leave Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe out on the counter? Can I make Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe ahead? Can I keep Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe in the refrigerator? Can I freeze Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe? What is the best way to defrost Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe? Can I make this Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe in a different quantity? Can I make Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe in a stand mixer such as a KitchenAid or Kenwood Mixer? Can I make Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe with a food processor? How can I make sure my Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe turns out perfectly? Why did my chocolate roulade break and crack? How can I stop it from breaking? How do I get a tighter roll for my chocolate roulade? Why did the cream in my chocolate roulade melt? Why did the cream split in my chocolate roulade? Why did the cream turn buttery? Why did my Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe turn out wet? How can I add/change the flavours in this Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe? Where is the origin of roulade? Who is Mary Berry? Print this chocolate roulade recipe Mary Berry's Chocolate Roulade Recipe (Great British Bake Off) Ingredients Equipment Instructions Video Notes Nutrition Pin this chocolate roulade recipe for later More chocolate recipes for you to try Have you got my book? References

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This deliciously chocolatey and satisfying chocolate roulade recipe is flour-free, which means it has an extremely light texture that's further helped with the whipped eggs.

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It has a unique, impossibly flavourful, yet feather-light consistency - a difference you'll definitely notice when compared to a traditional sponge swiss roll. You're going to LOVE it.

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Mary Berry's chocolate roulade also has a very high cocoa content thanks to both melted dark chocolate and added cocoa, so it also tastes super-rich and delicious and when combined with the silky smooth whipped cream.

You'll immediately notice the beautiful softness of this dessert as your fork glides the sponge, which then melts in your mouth.

This chocolate roulade is direct from the mind of baking genius, Mary Berry, and relayed to our kitchen by the wonder of the Great British Bake Off iPhone app.

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Released to complement the TV series, The Great British Bake Off iPhone app has a generous number of recipes selected from the best-selling books The Great British Bake Off: How to Bake and How to Turn Everyday Bakes into Showstoppers.

Every recipe is superb - they're so well measured and the technique so well explained, it's hard to go wrong. And this chocolate roulade recipe is no exception, although I've added loads of extra tips under the recipe to help make sure your turns out absolutely perfectly.

Ingredients

  • 175 g (6 oz) dark chocolate (bittersweet) 39% cocoa solids, finely chopped
  • 6 medium free range eggs at room temperature
  • 175 g (1 cup) white caster sugar (superfine sugar)
  • 2 tbsp cocoa powder (dutch processed)
  • 300 ml ( cups) double cream (heavy cream)
  • icing sugar (powdered sugar) for dusting
  • 1 tsp slightly salted butter for greasing

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 180C (160C fan).

Melt the chocolate in a heatproof bowl using 30-second blasts in the microwave until just melted. Set aside to cool to room temp.

Separate the eggs into two bowls, then whisk the egg whites with an electric mixer on high speed until they stand in stiff peaks. If you turn the bowl upside down, the whites should be stiff enough not to fall out.

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In the second bowl, add the sugar to the egg yolks and whisk using the electric mixer (no need to wash it) on high speed for 2 to 3 minutes or until very thick and pale in colour, and the mixture leaves a ribbon-like trail on itself when the whisk is lifted out.

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Pour the chocolate into the yolk mixture and fold in to blend

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Add 2 large spoonfuls of the whisked egg whites and stir in gently to loosen.

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Fold in the remaining egg whites using a large metal spoon. Avoid knocking out the air you have just whisked in.

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Sift the cocoa powder over the mixture and fold it in

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Grease and line the base and sides of a 23cm x 33cm nonstick swiss roll tin with nonstick baking paper. If you make a small diagonal snip in each corner of the paper, it will help fit snugly into the corners of the tin.

Pour the mixture into the tin and move it around so the mixture finds its own level

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Bake for 20-25 minutes or until risen. Remove and cool in the tin; the sponge will fall a little as it cools

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Lay a large piece of nonstick baking paper on the worktop and dust it lightly with icing sugar. Turn the sponge out onto the paper, then carefully peel off the lining paper

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Whip the cream for the filling until just holds its shape, then spread it over the sponge, leaving a clear edge of about 2cm on all sides. Then, using a sharp knife, make a shallow cut along one of the short edges

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Roll this cut edge over tightly to start. Use the sugar-dusted paper to continue tight rolling by pulling it away from you as you roll. Finish with the join underneath.

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Lift the roulade onto a serving plate or board using a large wide spatula or 2 fish slices. Cut into slices and enjoy!

Pointers, tricks and troubleshooting tips for the perfect Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe

What does roulade mean?

Roulade is a French word that means 'a rolling' that comes from 'roul(er)', which means to roll. Pretty simple!

How do you pronounce the word roulade?

You pronounce 'roulade' as if you are saying 'roo-laad' or 'roo-lahd'.

What is a roulade?

A roulade is a dish made by rolling together a thin layer of food. The word is French in origin and means "to roll".

Roulade can be sweet or savoury. A savoury roulade is typically made with meat or fish. A sweet roulade is usually made using a layer of pastry, or a sponge rolled with cream, fruit or chocolate ganache.

There are many different ways to make a roulade. This recipe uses a thin layer of flourless sponge spread with a whipped sweet cream filling.

What's the difference between a roulade and a pavlova?

A pavlova is similar to a roulade, but instead of pastry or a cake layer, the roll is made with a thin layer of meringue rolled with fruit and cream. It is named after the Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova.

What is the difference between a Swiss roll and a roulade?

A Swiss roll is similar to a roulade, but it is made with a thin layer of cake rolled with jam or cream. It is named after the Swiss Alps, as the rolled cake resembles a log.

Is Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe easy to make?

This roulade is so easy to make, you’ll be tempted to make one every week! As long as you have an electric whisk, this chocolate roulade recipe is surprisingly easy to whip up for the impressive results you get.

You’ll melt some chocolate in a microwave, then mix it with some egg yolks. In a separate bowl, you’ll use your whisk to whip the whites into stiff peaks. Then you gently fold in the other ingredients and bake the mixture in a lined tray.

While the mix bakes, you’ll whisk some double cream (heavy cream) - just take care not to split it! Once the cake is cooked and cool, you will spread the cream and roll it into a spiral-shaped roulade. Simple!

With the photos above and the extra tips below, you should have no trouble getting a picture-perfect roulade every time.

Will I need any special equipment to make Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe?

There's always a complete list of suggested equipment on the recipe card below my recipes if you're in doubt. In addition, I always include links to example products, to show exactly what I used to make each recipe.

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How can I tell if my cream has gone off?

When double cream (heavy cream) spoils, it behaves similarly to butter and milk. Though with one key difference.

Double cream sometimes has a slight amount of separation or thicker cream on top. This is often the fat rising to the top of the container. If you store your cream correctly and is within its Use-By date, then some separation is fine.

However, if your cream is old or has been opened and it has considerable separation, you should discard it.

Spoiled cream will have a strong, sour smell like spoiled milk or butter. The separation will be much more than usual, and there may even be patches of clear liquid. This happens when bacteria break down fat, protein and liquid bonds.

Finally, if your cream has any mould growing on it, that’s a clear sign it has gone off.

If your cream has spoiled, you should immediately discard it and wash anything it came into contact with. This is important as it helps to avoid cross-contamination.

How can I tell if eggs have gone off?

Eggs are a super important part of this recipe. You’ll need eggs in good condition and at room temperature to get lovely stiff peaks for your roulade sponge.

Eggs lose water content the older they get. This means egg whites are easier to whisk into peaks in older eggs. However, to avoid using a spoiled egg, it’s safer to use fresh eggs.

You should never eat an egg that looks, smells, feels or tastes odd in any way. So if your egg has any discolouration, odd appearance, or a strange or foul odour, it is most likely rotten.

If your egg has spoiled, you should immediately throw it away and thoroughly wash any pots and utensils that have come into contact with it.

How can I test whether my eggs have gone off?

If you’re unsure if an egg is fresh, you can drop it into a cup or bowl of water to see if it sinks or floats. However, this isn’t a foolproof method, as some spoiled eggs can still sink.

So it's always best to crack your egg into a separate bowl or cup before adding it to a recipe. That way, you can check the egg for shell fragments. But more importantly, it allows you to check that the egg is safe to eat.

While this recipe calls for eggs at room temperature, you should normally store your eggs below 20C or in the fridge. So, just before you begin the recipe, you could put your refrigerated eggs into a bowl of warm water for 5 minutes to bring them to room temperature.

Egg safety standards can vary depending on where you live, so check your local advice. Egg safety is crucial if you're cooking for someone in an at-risk group, like older people, people living with health conditions, or a pregnant person.

A Mummy Too does not give medical advice. Please consult with your medical professional.

How can I tell if my butter has gone off?

First, you should check the Best Before date on the packet. This should give you a good indication as to whether the butter is still safe to use.

You should never eat food that is over its Use By date, as Use By dates indicate when a food is no longer safe to eat. Whereas Best Before dates are there to indicate quality, and food a little past that date may still be safe to eat.

Spoiled butter will become a darker colour and sometimes even develop translucent patches as the fat and liquid separate. Similarly, spoiled butter can also develop a layer of condensation or sweat.

When bacteria break down the butter even further, it develops a sour or rancid smell from the lactic acid. This will give the butter a rancid or fizzy taste/texture too.

Check that there is no mould growing on the butter. It's unlikely if you store your butter correctly. However, can happen if any crumbs get stuck in the butter. Mould is obviously a sure indicator that the butter is no longer safe to use.

How should I store butter?

You should keep your butter in the fridge, wrapped in the foil or paper wrapper and then inside a container or a fridge door compartment that seals.

When you leave butter open to the air it starts to oxidise and go off quicker. This is why it's usually best to keep it chilled. Modern homes with central heating are too warm to keep butter in a butter dish out of the fridge.

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Is Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe suitable for vegetarians?

This chocolate roulade is vegetarian, yes. It is not vegan as it contains eggs and cream as core ingredients.

Animal-derived products can be used to thicken, colour or flavour sweet and savoury food, so it sneaks into the most surprising ingredients! So always make sure that you double-check all of your ingredients labels to ensure that they are vegetarian. Also, don't forget to check anything extra that you intend to serve with your recipe.

Is Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe suitable for vegans?

This chocolate roulade contains eggs and dairy, so it isn’t suitable for vegans.

Normally, I would recommend vegan substitutions for ingredients, but this recipe relies on the texture of the eggs for the sponge layer, so it wouldn’t be suitable for adapting.

For example, the only ingredient which might come close to egg whites is aquafaba (the water from a tin of chickpeas), but I’m not so sure it would cook exactly as the eggs do in this recipe.

If you’ve made one, or you want me to create a vegan chocolate roulade recipe let me know in the comments!

Animal-derived products can be used to thicken, colour or flavour sweet and savoury food, so it sneaks into the most surprising ingredients! So always make sure that you double-check all of your ingredients labels to ensure that they are vegan. Also, don't forget to check anything extra that you intend to serve with your recipe.

Is Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe gluten-free?

Yes! A roulade is a great recipe for someone avoiding gluten, as it is usually made using a flourless sponge. This recipe is no exception, with a flourless sponge, making it a naturally gluten-free chocolate roulade.

However, always check the information on the packaging of each ingredient before you start to ensure they're all gluten-free.

Is Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe keto-friendly?

Unfortunately, this chocolate roulade recipe isn’t suitable for a ketogenic diet. Despite the lower amount of carbohydrates, the amount of sugar in this recipe still makes it unsuitable.

Is Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe healthy?

This recipe contains a fair amount of sugar and fat, so it isn’t very healthy. However, everyone deserves a treat sometimes. So as long as it’s enjoyed as part of an otherwise healthy and varied diet, don’t worry!

Is Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe safe to eat while pregnant?

Yes, it should be safe to eat this chocolate roulade while pregnant. Just make sure that you cook the sponge through and that you observe safe storage practices since this recipe uses fresh cream.

Make sure that all of your ingredients are in good condition and that you prepare your chocolate roulade safely and hygienically.

A Mummy Too does not offer medical advice. Please seek help from a medical professional if you need further information or have any concerns.

What goes well with Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe?

This chocolate roulade recipe would be perfect with some fresh fruit or a fruit sauce to cut through the richness. Raspberry is a common ingredient to pair with chocolate and roulade, so you could cook down, cool and blitz some raspberries for a raspberry coulis. Or you could skip the cooking and blitz around 300g raspberries with 3/4 cup of prosecco (or sparkling wine) and sugar to taste for a more aerated texture.

Why do I have to whisk the egg whites and yolks separately in this recipe?

Whisking the egg whites results in the super-light, easily malleable sponge layer, and adds body which the wheat flour in a sponge would usually add.

Is this sponge a chiffon cake?

A chiffon sponge is a light, airy cake made with egg whites, sugar, and flour. The sponge layer for this cake contains no flour, so it isn't traditional chiffon, but the principle is similar.

The sponge layer in this roulade is made using egg whites, chocolate and cocoa powder. The protein and fat work to form a flexible, springy but airy layer - perfect for rolling into a roulade!

Why are egg whites important in a chiffon cake sponge?

Egg whites are important in a chiffon cake sponge as they help to create a light and airy texture. The texture is formed by the egg cooking and setting around air bubbles formed when the eggs are whipped.

This process is important for this recipe, as the texture of the egg whites are crucial for getting the flexible sponge layer.

What is the best way to fold in the egg whites?

The best way to fold in the egg whites is to add them in three parts. Add one-third of the egg whites to the batter and gently fold them in using a rubber spatula. Then add the remaining egg whites in two parts, folding gently after each addition.

Can I add extra chocolate to this recipe?

I wouldn’t add any extra chocolate to the sponge, as it might impact the cooking time or texture. So if you want to add some extra chocolate to this recipe, you’re best off using it to decorate your completed roulade.

You could grate some chocolate over the top of the roulade after you dust it with icing sugar. Or you could drizzle the chocolate roulade with melted white chocolate instead of the icing sugar. The colour contrast would look great, and it’s an easy way to get some extra chocolate on there.

How should I store Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe?

The best place to store Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe is in the fridge in an airtight container. The recipe contains uncooked cream, so it would quickly spoil if left at room temperature.

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How long will Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe keep?

Your chocolate roulade should keep for up to 3 days in the refrigerator as long as you store it inside a sealed container.

When you serve your chocolate roulade, it will be better to let the slices come to room temperature before serving. Letting the slices sit for 10-15 minutes before serving will really improve the texture and let the flavour shine.

Can I leave Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe out on the counter?

No, the cream in your chocolate roulade would become very soft and start to melt if left it out on the counter. And if you left it out for a while the cream would quickly spoil.

So when you aren’t serving it, it’s best to keep it in the fridge in a sealed container.

Can I make Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe ahead?

You can make this chocolate roulade the night before, if you like, but it's important that you get it into the refrigerator immediately, as fresh cream does not keep well at room temperature.

Ideally, I would recommend you make your roulade the same day you want to eat it.

If you need to make it more than a day ahead, it will freeze well (see below), so you could make it in advance but not dust it, then thaw it on the day and dust it with sugar to finish.

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Can I keep Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe in the refrigerator?

Yes, this chocolate roulade can be chilled, but make sure to refrigerate it as soon as it's been made, and store it in an airtight container - it should keep for a couple of days.

Can I freeze Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe?

You can freeze your roulade, but it’s best to slice it before you freeze it. If you freeze your roulade the texture will most likely be impacted, as dairy can often split or thicken. This is why pre-slicing will make it easier to serve a defrosted roulade.

So cut it into slices or sections first, and then use greaseproof paper to separate the sections inside an airtight container. Pre-slicing also lets you defrost a slice as you want it, rather than committing to defrosting a whole roulade.

Even if you use a lunch box with a lid, you should also cover the top of the slices with some paper or cling film. This will help reduce the likelihood of freezer burn, which can negatively affect the quality of frozen food.

What is the best way to defrost Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe?

When you want to defrost your roulade, just take a slice from the container and place it onto a plate or bowl. Cover the plate/bowl and place it into the fridge.

It should take around 4 hours for a slice to defrost. So take your slice out on the morning of the day you plan to eat it.

Can I make this Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe in a different quantity?

If you want to make a bigger or smaller chocolate roulade, go ahead! I haven’t tried this recipe in a different size, but in theory, it should work.

However, I wouldn’t make a roulade which is much bigger or smaller than this, as it would be difficult to roll.

To change the size of your recipe, you can divide the current amounts of each ingredient into the number of servings it makes (8). That will give you the amount of ingredients 1 portion size. Then multiply that number by the number of servings you want. So if you wanted to make a 12 portion roulade, you would divide every ingredient by 8 and then multiply by 12.

E.g:

175 g dark chocolate ÷ 8 = 21.8g dark chocolate

21.8g dark chocolate x 12 = 262g dark chocolate

or

6 eggs ÷ 8 = 0.75 egg

0.75 egg x 12 = 9 eggs

If this seems a bit too much work, there are also free online recipe calculators you can use to calculate a new recipe yield.

Can I make Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe in a stand mixer such as a KitchenAid or Kenwood Mixer?

Yes, an electric whisk or stand mixer is essential for this recipe. You will need to use a stand mixer with a balloon whisk attachment to whisk your egg whites into stiff peaks.

You should mix everything else by hand in a separate bowl, and you should definitely fold the ingredients into the egg whites by hand to avoid knocking the air out of the whites.

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Can I make Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe with a food processor?

A food processor would be far too powerful for this recipe and the blades of a food processor wouldn’t whisk egg whites sufficiently.

How can I make sure my Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe turns out perfectly?

These tips will help you achieve a perfect roulade that is light, rolls beautifully and tastes great.

Here are some tips to help make sure your chocolate roulade doesn't crack badly, starting with the most common mistakes:

  • Use fresh, room temperature eggs: Try to use the freshest eggs you can as the protein structure will be ideal to give a stable base when whisked. Allow them to come up to room temperature so that they don't curdle with the chocolate.
  • Don't overbeat your eggs: Once your egg whites achieve a stiff peaks stage (where they hold their shape), stop whisking. Whisking for longer, or on too high a setting, can mean that the foam takes on air bubbles that are too big, which can leave large pockets of air when the sponge is baking, which in turn leads to weak points that are more prone to cracking.
  • Make sure your sponge layers aren't too thick: Note the recommended size of the tin in the recipe and stick to it. If you go smaller, your roulade may be too thick to roll.
  • Set your oven correctly: Make sure your oven temperature is set correctly - too hot and it will overcook and become too firm to roll.
  • Don't overcook the sponge: Take it out of the oven as soon as it is firm on top. If you let it set very firm, it will be too dry and crack.
  • Make sure you both grease and line your tin: This is important so that you can get your chocolate roulade sponge out delicately in one piece.
  • Go slow: While rolling your chocolate roulade, work slowly and evenly and only squeeze the paper very gently to help the roulade keep its shape.
  • Leave it to cool in the tin. You must let your chocolate roulade cool completely in the tin - it will be far too delicate to handle while hot and may break or deflate.
  • Use a towel to soften a dry top: If you're worried the top of your sponge have overbaked, you might be able to save it. Lightly spritz a tea towel with water and rest it lightly over the sponge while it cools. The steam should help soften it a little.

Why did my chocolate roulade break and crack? How can I stop it from breaking?

A few little cracks is part of the charm of a roulade, but a giant crack or full break can be problematic as it might allow the filling to leak out, or cause the roulade to fall apart.

How do I get a tighter roll for my chocolate roulade?

You won't get many rolls out of this roulade as it has quite a thick sponge layer, but you should be able to easily achieve an effect like the one pictured.

If you haven't managed to achieve a spiral effect with the cream, you may have rolled too loosely.

When rolling a roulade, you need a delicate but firm hand. Making sure the start of the roll is nice and tight will make rolling the rest easier.

Here are a couple of extra tricks for rolling a roulade which seems too brittle:

  • If you're really having problems you can score a very shallow line just a couple of millimetres deep across the edge you're going to start with and about 3cm in. This should help you get a nice, even and tight roll from the start.
  • If you think your sponge is too dry and inflexible to roll, you could use a clean spray bottle to mist the sponge with water. This small amount of moisture should help give it a little flexibility and make rolling easier. Take care not to spray the roulade too much, it shouldn't be soggy, only very slightly moistened.

Why did the cream in my chocolate roulade melt?

It's super important that you let your chocolate roulade sponge cool completely before turning out and spreading with the cream. If the cream is exposed to heat from the sponge, it will break down to a greasy liquid.

Alternatively, it could be that your cream wasn't whipped enough and so isn't holding its structure.

Why did the cream split in my chocolate roulade? Why did the cream turn buttery?

If you over-whip your cream, it may turn buttery, meaning the fat seizes up and some watery liquid is released. For this recipe, you only want to beat the cream until it just holds its shape.

Aim to keep it in the fridge until you are ready to use it. As cream becomes warmer, it’s more likely to curdle or split as the bonds between liquid, fat and protein become slack.

If your cream splits then don’t worry, you can usually fix it. If your cream split and it’s not very cold, try putting the bowl into the fridge for 15 minutes and whisking again. Or you could whisk the bowl over a bag of ice or frozen ice pack.

If your cream was cold, but it turned buttery from overmixing, you could try gradually adding a few teaspoons of unbeaten cream while mixing it slowly to bring the cream back.

Why did my Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe turn out wet?

If your roulade is very wet, then your cream probably isn't thick enough. This will cause the cream to seep into the roulade. So make sure you whisk your cream until it is thinner than cream cheese but still spreadable and thicker than spray cream.

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How can I add/change the flavours in this Mary Berry's Chocolate roulade recipe?

Changing a Mary Berry recipe feels like sacrilege! But if you want to add to it, I would recommend adding some orange zest when you add the cocoa powder to the sponge mix, for a chocolate orange roulade.

However, adding ingredients runs the risk of ruining egg whites, so you could flavour your cream with orange essence instead.

If you want more ideas, I also have a list of brilliant swiss roll and roulade recipes from some of my favourite sites.

Where is the origin of roulade?

Roulades are a popular dish in Europe, but they aren’t just a dessert. Roulade comes from a French word meaning ‘to roll’, so roulade is more a term for any sort of a rolled dish. There are a few kinds of meat roulades popular in France and Germany. Or, you may have seen roule cheese in supermarkets, they’re technically a form of roulade too.

As I mentioned above, roulade is a French word. So it’s most likely that roulade was invented in a French-speaking country.

Or it may have been invented somewhere close.The first written recipe for a roulade is in a cookbook called Le Cuisinier Gascon, published in Amsterdam in 1740. So they’ve been rolling around Europe since at least the 1740s.

Who is Mary Berry?

Mary Berry is a British food writer and television presenter. Nowadays, she's best known for her work on the BBC programme The Great British Bake Off. However, Berry has had a long career, authoring over 75 cookery books, including several best-sellers.

She is considered an authority on baking around the world, so you can trust that this recipe will be 100% delicious!

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Mary Berry’s Chocolate Roulade Recipe (Great British Bake Off) (28)

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4.6 from 56 votes

Mary Berry's Chocolate Roulade Recipe (Great British Bake Off)

This deliciously chocolatey and satisfying chocolate roulade recipe is flour-free, which means it has an extremely light texture that's further helped with the whipped eggs.

Prep Time30 minutes mins

Cook Time20 minutes mins

Total Time50 minutes mins

Course: Desserts and sweet treats

Cuisine: French

Diet: Gluten Free, Vegetarian

Servings: 8 people

Author: Mary Berry

Ingredients

  • 175 g (6 oz) dark chocolate (bittersweet) 39% cocoa solids, finely chopped
  • 6 medium free range eggs at room temperature
  • 175 g (1 cup) white caster sugar (superfine sugar)
  • 2 tbsp cocoa powder (dutch processed)
  • 300 ml ( cups) double cream (heavy cream)
  • icing sugar (powdered sugar) for dusting
  • 1 tsp slightly salted butter for greasing

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 180C (160C fan, 350F).

  • Melt the chocolate in a heatproof bowl using 30-second blasts in the microwave until just melted. Set aside to cool to room temp.

  • Separate the eggs into two bowls, then whisk the egg whites with an electric mixer on high speed until they stand in stiff peaks. If you turn the bowl upside down, the whites should be stiff enough not to fall out.

  • In the second bowl, add the sugar to the egg yolks and whisk using the electric mixer (no need to wash ion high speed for 2 to 3 minutes or until very thick and pale in colour, and the mixture leaves a ribbon-like trail on itself when the whisk is lifted out.

  • Pour the chocolate into the yolk mixture and fold in to blend

  • Add 2 large spoonfuls of the whisked egg whites and stir in gently to loosen.

  • Fold in the remaining egg whites using a large metal spoon. Avoid knocking out the air you have just whisked in

  • Sift the cocoa powder over the mixture and fold it in

  • Grease and line the base and sides of a 23cm x 33cm nonstick swiss roll with nonstick baking paper. If you make a small diagonal snip in each corner of the paper, it will help fit snugly into the corners of the tin.

  • Pour the mixture into the tin and move it around so the mixture finds its own level

  • Bake for 20-25 minutes or until risen. Remove and cool in the tin; the sponge will fall a little as it cools

  • Lay a large piece of nonstick baking paper on the worktop and dust it lightly with icing sugar. Turn the sponge out onto the paper, then carefully peel off the lining paper

  • Whip the cream for the filling until just holds its shape, then spread it over the sponge, leaving a clear edge of about 2cm on all sides

  • Using a sharp knife, make a shallow cut along one of the short edges

  • Roll this cut edge over tightly to start. Use the sugar-dusted paper to continue tight rolling by pulling it away from you as you roll. Finish with the join underneath

  • Lift the roulade onto a serving plate or board using a large wide spatula or 2 fish slices. Serve in slices and enjoy!

Video

Notes

This chocolate roulade should keep for a couple of days in the refrigerator - it will not keep at room temp.

If it has become very cold in the refrigerator, serve the slices then let them sit for 10 minutes for the ideal texture.

Nutrition

Calories: 400kcal | Carbohydrates: 34g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 27g | Saturated Fat: 15g | Cholesterol: 176mg | Sodium: 70mg | Potassium: 251mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 27g | Vitamin A: 754IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 61mg | Iron: 3mg

* Note: nutritional information is estimated, based on publicly available data. Nutrient values may vary from those published. Information on this website should not be taken as medical advice. Cuisines identify the primary region of inspiration for a dish.

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